From the Studio: A Time and Space of My Own Design

My work this semester has distilled down into a series of diptychs; blurry, personal work concerning my relationship to time and identity. They draw deeply from self-work I am doing.

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©Casey Clough, untitled diptych from “A Time and Space of My Own Design”

I’m really happy with how the series came together, artistically. I am still a little nervous about the departmental portfolio reviews, but then, I always am.

©Casey Clough, untitled diptych from "A Time and Space of My Own Design"

©Casey Clough, untitled diptych from “A Time and Space of My Own Design”

While I have orphaned yet another 365 project, it was a very fruitful undertaking. Carrying my camera all of the time, and putting myself under constant pressure to catch something every day allowed me to see some threads that continually run through what catches my attention.

©Casey Clough, untitled diptych from "A Time and Space of My Own Design"

©Casey Clough, untitled diptych from “A Time and Space of My Own Design”

I need to sit down and polish my artist and project statement. While that is always challenging, I’m finding it especially so for this series. This work is very personal, in addition to being a series of self-portraits. I’m finding the line between enough personal information to provide context and meaning and so much that it becomes didactic and droll hard to maneuver.

©Casey Clough, untitled diptych from "A Time and Space of My Own Design"

©Casey Clough, untitled diptych from “A Time and Space of My Own Design”

I’m not entirely sold on the diptych format, but I think it is the best compromise given the display constraints of the print show. Given creative control, all ten images would be printed large, and then hung in the appropriate order.

©Casey Clough, untitled diptych from "A Time and Space of My Own Design"

©Casey Clough, untitled diptych from “A Time and Space of My Own Design”

One of the things I find most interesting about this series is the pairing. I did not know that I was taking matching images, not consciously. I kept having the nagging feeling that I was missing something when I was editing and trying to select images, and it didn’t click until a class discussion where there was debate over whether to include the landscape/glass shots, or only the self portraits. I knew that the glass images were necessary, but it wasn’t until last week that it suddenly became clear why. Art is a mysterious process.

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